Potatoes Can Be Part of Healthy Diet, Says Study


Washington, November 18: Potatoes are frequently included on a list of foods to stay away from, especially for people with insulin resistance, because of their reputation for causing weight gain and an elevated risk of type 2 diabetes.

However, a new study from Pennington Biomedical Research Center, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, says that potatoes actually did not increase that risk, are filled with key nutrients, and packed with health benefits. Keto Diet Is Killing Planet Earth Says Harvard Expert; 4 Reasons Why the Diet is Not Environment-Friendly.

Candida Rebello, PhD, an assistant professor at Pennington Biomedical, served as co-investigator of the study which examined how a diet including potatoes affects key health measures. Rebello, who is also a registered dietitian, said, “We demonstrated that contrary to common belief, potatoes do not negatively impact blood glucose levels. In fact, the individuals who participated in our study lost weight.” Keto Diet: How To Overcome The 5 Common Side Effects of the Ketogenic Diet.

“People tend to eat the same weight of food regardless of calorie content in order to feel full,” Rebello explained. “By eating foods with a heavier weight that are low in calories, you can easily reduce the number of calories you consume. The key aspect of our study is that we did not reduce the portion size of meals but lowered their caloric content by including potatoes. Each participant’s meal was tailored to their personalized caloric needs, yet by replacing some meat content with potato, participants found themselves fuller, quicker, and often did not even finish their meal. In effect, you can lose weight with little effort.”

The study involved 36 participants between the ages of 18 and 60 who were overweight, had obesity, or insulin resistance. Insulin resistance refers to a health condition in which the body’s cells do not respond well to insulin and glucose does not enter into the cells to make energy. Insulin resistance is linked to obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes.

Participants were fed precisely-controlled diets of widely available common foods…



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